Due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, the Temple has temporarily suspended all on-site activities until further notice. 916-444-0111

Northern California Koyasan Temple

Shingon Esoteric Buddhism| Sacramento, CA

Due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, the Temple has temporarily suspended all on-site activities until further notice.

5
1920

Sacramento Daishiko 

  • was initiated and organized by Mrs. Toshie Yamamoto at her farm house with Mr. Sakuma Shimada and Mrs. Eiju Nakashima near the present site of William Land Park.
4
1938

With the growth

  •  
    of membership in Stockton, the Daishiji Temple was built 45 miles south of Stockton.
5
1939

 The Sacramento Daishiko

  • moved and built a new shrine in West Sacramento, known as Rikeiji Temple.
4
1940

The Perkins Daishiko

  • was organized by Mrs. Hatsuno Sunahara in East Sacramento.
5
1947

Bishop Seytsu Takahashi

  • established the San Jose Daishiko at the Nakashima residence in Milpitas. At the end of World War II, the Petaluma Daishiko was established by the Imoto family.
4
1956
A new Perkins Daishiko

  • assembly hall was built and dedicated by the Sunahara family and its members in East Sacramento.
5
1970

The Sacramento (Rikeiji) Daishiko

  •  and Perkins Daishiko were merged into one religious organization — the Koyasan Buddhist Church. An old Italian church at the Temple’s present location was purchased and remodeled under the leadership of Rev. Eishun Shigetoshi and Mr. Kenkichi Kurosawa, first president of the new church.
4
1976

Additional facilities 

  • a social hall and parking lot, were constructed by A-1 Construction Company.

5
1977

The annual Toro-nagashi

  • rite on the river was started at Miller Park in Sacramento.
4
1980

Upon completion of the church’s remodel

  • and expansion, Koyasan headquarters in Japan elevated the church’s status to the Northern California Koyasan Temple (Shorinji), which would serve as the Northern California headquarters.
5
1993

The Koyasan Spirit

  • of Children Taiko Group was formed and started to perform for the community.
4
1994

A residence on Freehaven Drive

  • Sacramento, was purchased for the minister’s residence.
5
2000

The Temple renovation

  • project is completed and a special 30th anniversary celebration of the Northern California Koyasan Temple was held.
4
2010

The Temple was renamed

  • from “Shorinji” to “Keigenji.”
5
2011

A commemorative service

  • celebrating the 90th anniversary of the Koyasan Mission in Northern California and the 40th anniversary of the Northern California Koyasan Temple was held. The vacant minister’s residence on Freehaven Drive, Sacramento, was sold.
4
2014

The Temple’s Bylaws

  • established and adopted in 1971, were amended and adopted on September 21, 2014.
1920

Sacramento Daishiko 

  • was initiated and organized by Mrs. Toshie Yamamoto at her farm house with Mr. Sakuma Shimada and Mrs. Eiju Nakashima near the present site of William Land Park.
1938

With The Growth

  • of membership in Stockton, the Daishiji Temple was built 45 miles south of Stockton
1939

The Sacramento Daishiko

  • moved and built a new shrine in West Sacramento, known as Rikeiji Temple.
1940

The Perkins Daishiko

  • was organized by Mrs. Hatsuno Sunahara in East Sacramento
1947

Bishop Seytsu Takahashi

  • established the San Jose Daishiko at the Nakashima residence in Milpitas. At the end of World War II, the Petaluma Daishiko was established by the Imoto family.
1956

A New Perkins Daishiko

  • assembly hall was built and dedicated by the Sunahara family and its members in East Sacramento.
1970

The Sacramento (Rikeiji) Daishiko

  •  and Perkins Daishiko were merged into one religious organization — the Koyasan Buddhist Church. An old Italian church at the Temple’s present location was purchased and remodeled under the leadership of Rev. Eishun Shigetoshi and Mr. Kenkichi Kurosawa, first president of the new church.
1976

Additional facilities

  • a social hall and parking lot, were constructed by A-1 Construction Company.
1977

The annual Toro-nagashi

  • rite on the river was started at Miller Park in Sacramento.
1980

Upon completion of the church’s remodel

  • and expansion, Koyasan headquarters in Japan elevated the church’s status to the Northern California Koyasan Temple (Shorinji), which would serve as the Northern California headquarters.
1993

The Koyasan Spirit

  • and Perkins Daishiko were merged into one religious organization — the Koyasan Buddhist Church. An old Italian church at the Temple’s present location was purchased and remodeled under the leadership of Rev. Eishun Shigetoshi and Mr. Kenkichi Kurosawa, first president of the new church.
1994

A residence on Freehaven Drive

  • Sacramento, was purchased for the minister’s residence.
2000

The Temple renovation

  • project is completed and a special 30th anniversary celebration of the Northern California Koyasan Temple was held.
2010

The Temple was renamed

  • from “Shorinji” to “Keigenji”
2011

A commemorative service

  • celebrating the 90th anniversary of the Koyasan Mission in Northern California and the 40th anniversary of the Northern California Koyasan Temple was held. The vacant minister’s residence on Freehaven Drive, Sacramento, was sold
2014

The Temple’s Bylaws

  • established and adopted in 1971, were amended and adopted on September 21, 2014

Contact

Get in touch today to learn more about our services, become a member, schedule a wedding, or take taiko or karate classes.

Email Address
Call

(916) 444-0111

Visit

1400 U Street
Sacramento, CA
95818